A Jihadist's Journey

In 2005, Qasab left Faridkot, above, for Lahore. The Urdu graffiti on the wall in this photo reads,
Country Town
In 2005, Mohammad Amir Ajmal Qasab left Faridkot, above, for Lahore. The Urdu graffiti on the wall in this photo reads, "Go for jihad. Go for jihad."

Hungry for riches, Qasab ended up in Rawalpindi's Raja Bazaar.
Big City
Hungry for riches, Qasab ended up in Rawalpindi's Raja Bazaar, where, in 2007, he made contact with Lashkar-e-Taibi (LeT), an Islamist extremist group that has been blamed for the Mumbai attacks.
LeT is supported by Hafiz Saeed, the leader of Jamaat-ud-Dawa, a banned charity.

Firebrand
LeT is supported by Hafiz Saeed, the leader of Jamaat-ud-Dawa, a banned charity.
Jamaat-ud-Dawa's offices are located in Pakistani-administered Kashmir, whose independence from India they support.


Banned Group 
Jamaat-ud-Dawa's offices are located in Pakistani-administered Kashmir, whose independence from India they support.

Reconnaissance
To launch their offensive on Mumbai, Qasab and his group of commandos were shown Google Earth images of the city.

They used an inflatable dinghy to reach the shore...
Transport
They used an inflatable dinghy to reach the shore

And landed at the jetty at Budhwar Park, where fishermen dock their boats.
Beachhead
And landed at the jetty at Budhwar Park, where fishermen dock their boats.
Heavily armed, Qasab arrives at the Chatrapathi Sivaji Terminal railway station and opens fire.

Gunman
Heavily armed, Qasab arrives at the Chatrapathi Sivaji Terminal railway station and opens fire
The attack at the station claimed the lives of 58 people.

ftermath
The attack at the station claimed the lives of 58 people
While it is believed that all of Qasab's co-conspirators were killed in the attacks, he was captured by Mumbai police.

In Custody
While it is believed that all of Qasab's co-conspirators were killed in the attacks, he was captured by Mumbai police. His movements have been reconstructed from the confession he gave to the authoritie