LANCET AND WHITE MAN'S BURDEN :- TRAVEL ADVISORY TO WHITE MAN---- 'NOT TO GO TO DIRTY INDIA'

Imperialism and the White Man's Burden


THE WHITE COLONIALIST WHO RULED OVER THE(SO CALLED) DARK CONTINENT NOW CALLED AFRICA AND INDIA AND MOST OF THE OTHER COUNTRIES OF THE WORLD BEFORE 1947 ;USED TO- "WORRY"- ABOUT CIVILIZING THE UNEDUCATED UN CULTURED UNWASHED BILLIONS ;UNDER THEIR RULE
 WHITE RULERS  USED TO HAVE SNOOTY ,MALEVOLENT AND MALIGNANT ATTITUDE TOWARDS THE INDIANS  AND OTHERS ; AND KEPT A- 'STIFF UPPER LIP' -TO SHOW THEIR SUPERIORITY “The Formula of British Conquest: Pears Soap in the Soudan. Even if our invasion of the Soudan has done nothing else, it has at any rate left the Arab something to puzzle his fuzzy head over. Pears soap is the best.”
“The Birth of Civilization: A Message from the Sea. The consumption of soap is a measure of the wealth, civilisation, health and purity of the people.”
Wow.“The first step to lightening the White Man’s Burden is through teaching the virtues of cleanliness. Pear’s Soap is a potent factor in brightening the dark corners of the earth as civilisation advances, while amongst the cultured of all nations it holds the highest place – it is the ideal toilet soap.”
                                                                                                 AFRICA UNDER COLONIAL RULE 1870 -1960
Learning civilized ways is hard work [SAYS THE CHINESE; 1850]
The Opium War[SELLING OPIUM FOR PROFIT TO CHINA AND  THE THE FIRST DRUG TRADER WAS BRITAIN] 1850 SHANGHAI
Rudyard Kipling 

The great spokesperson for American imperialism, ironically, was the British writer Rudyard Kipling, whose "The White Man's Burden"appeared in February 1899, just as the newly founded Philippine Republic declared war upon the United States. The U.S. had refused to withdraw its troops following the surrender of Spain and also had refused to recognize the new Republic.

he became a staunch advocate of western imperialism. It brought "civilization" to "new-caught sullen peoples." It was, in fact, a moral obligation. Favored nations and races had the responsibility to "take up the White Man's burden." Kipling wrote the poem to urge the United States to take over the Philippines. It was time for the United States to take its proper place as an imperial power.

Rudyard Kipling, "The White Man's Burden" published in McClure's Magazine, Feb. 1899
Take up the White Man's burden--
Send forth the best ye breed--
Go, bind your sons to exile
To serve your captives' need; 
To wait, in heavy harness,
On fluttered folk and wild--
Your new-caught sullen peoples, 
Half devil and half child.
Take up the White Man's burden--
In patience to abide,
To veil the threat of terror
And check the show of pride;
By open speech and simple,
An hundred times made plain,
To seek another's profit
And work another's gain.
Take up the White Man's burden--
The savage wars of peace--
Fill full the mouth of Famine,
And bid the sickness cease;
And when your goal is nearest
(The end for others sought)
Watch sloth and heathen folly
Bring all your hope to nought.

                                                              Noël Coward


Sir Noël Peirce Coward (16 December 1899 – 26 March 1973) was an English playwright, composer, director, actor and singer, known for his wit, flamboyance, and what Time magazine called "a sense of personal style, a combination of cheek and chic, pose and poise".
Born in Teddington, a suburb of London,

THE NATIVES VIEW OF THEIR RULER -THE WHITE MAN -BY NOEL COWARD

{ mad dogs and Englishmen Go out in the midday sun.}


In tropical climes there are certain times of day

When all the citizens retire

To tear their clothes off and perspire.

It's one of those rules that the greatest fools obey,

Because the sun is much too sultry

And one must avoid its ultra-violet ray.


The natives grieve when the white men leave their huts,

Because they're obviously definitely nuts!


Mad dogs and Englishmen

Go out in the midday sun,

The Japanese don't care to.

The Chinese wouldn't dare to,

Hindoos and Argentines sleep firmly from twelve to one.

But Englishmen detest a siesta.

In the Philippines

There are lovely screens

To protect you from the glare.

In the Malay States

There are hats like plates

Which the Britishers won't wear.

At twelve noon

The natives swoon

And no further work is done,

But mad dogs and Englishmen

Go out in the midday sun.


It's such a surprise for the Eastern eyes to see

That though the English are effete,

They're quite impervious to heat,

When the white man rides every native hides in glee,

Because the simple creatures hope he

Will impale his solar topee on a tree.


It seems such a shame

When the English claim

The earth

That they give rise to such hilarity and mirth.


Mad dogs and Englishmen

Go out in the midday sun.

The toughest Burmese bandit

Can never understand it.

In Rangoon the heat of noon

Is just what the natives shun,

They put their Scotch or Rye down,

And lie down.

In a jungle town

Where the sun beats down

To the rage of man and beast

The English garb

Of the English sahib

Merely gets a bit more creased.

In Bangkok

At twelve o'clock

They foam at the mouth and run,

But mad dogs and Englishmen

Go out in the midday sun.


Mad dogs and Englishmen

Go out in the midday sun.

The smallest Malay rabbit

Deplores this foolish habit.

In Hong Kong

They strike a gong

And fire off a noonday gun,

To reprimand each inmate

Who's in late.

In the mangrove swamps

Where the python romps

There is peace from twelve till two.

Even caribous

Lie around and snooze,

For there's nothing else to do.

In Bengal

To move at all is seldom,

If ever done,

But mad dogs and Englishmen

Go out in the midday sun.




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... This factory — “the architecture of 13,000,000 pounds of opium production,” as Ptak Science Books calls it — is part of a larger British colonial landgrab fueled, at least in part, by pursuit of the immense profits to be earned from an unrestricted drug trade. As Amitav Ghosh, in an interview about his novel, Sea of Poppies, explains, “The Ghazipur and Patna opium factories between them produced the wealth of Britain. It is astonishing to think of it but the Empire was really founded on opium.”